Renaissance Revival architecture (sometimes referred to as “Neo-Renaissance”) is a group of 19th century architectural revival styles which were neither Greek Revival nor Gothic Revival but which instead drew inspiration from a wide range of classicizing Italian modes. Under the broad designation Renaissance architecture nineteenth-century architects and critics went beyond the architectural style which began in Florence and central Italy in the early 15th century as an expression of Renaissance humanism; they also included styles we would identify as Mannerist or Baroque. Self-applied style designations were rife in the mid- and later nineteenth century: “Neo-Renaissance” might be applied by contemporaries to structures that others called “Italianate”, or when many French Baroque features are present (Second Empire).

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